15-traffic-laws-from-around-the-world-that-will-surprise-you
15 TRAFFIC LAWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD THAT WILL SURPRISE YOU

So that they don't catch you, we've discovered 15 of the most ludicrous and odd, but most serious, rules.

Breathalyzers are a type of breathalyzer that is used to detect alcohol (France)

If you're going to Paris, make sure all drivers of cars and motorcycles have a breathalyzer. Otherwise, you will be fined € 11 if the police stop you and you do not reveal it to them when they ask.

Stickers from the European Union (EU)

Unless your car's license plate has the letters GB on it, you'll need a sticker with the letters GB to drive in Europe. In addition, you must have a picture of the queen on your dashboard and wear a bowler hat (no, that's not a joke!).

Children (France)

If the car does not have a dedicated child seat, children under the age of ten cannot travel in the front seat in France. The only exemption is if the vehicle does not have rear seats (if you have a Lotus, you're safe), or if the rear seats do not have seat belts (but isn't that illegal?). Alternatively, if the back seat is already occupied by a child under the age of ten (wearing a belt, of course).

The Red Light Rule is number four (USA)

When you're in a rush, you curse them, yet a red light means you're coming to a complete stop. You may face harsh consequences if you do not quit. However, in the United States, you can turn right at a red light if the roadway is clear of vehicles and pedestrians.             

The horn (various countries)

While persistent use of the horn is required in some nations (for increased efficiency, paired with the most colorful epithets thrown at other road users), it may come as a surprise that in many others, such as the United Kingdom, it is prohibited at night or in urban areas.

Trams (Norway)

Trams take primacy in Norway. You are free to test the rule, but we do not recommend it.

Lights (several countries)

Normally, leaving the lights on drains the battery, but in countries like Sweden, where daylight hours are limited in the winter, it is mandatory to have them on at all times, even on a bright summer day.

Alcohol (Macedonia)

Of course, drinking and driving are against the law. However, the authorities in Macedonia go even further: if you are under the influence of alcohol, you are not allowed to sit in the front seat, apparently because you would be useless as a co-pilot.

Alcohol (USA)

State-by-state traffic legislation exists in the United States. Carrying alcoholic beverages in the car is illegal in several states. Put the box of Bud Light in the trunk if you're driving along Skyline Drive with the windows down and John Denver on the radio.

Drink (Cyprus)

We no longer discuss alcohol; but, in Cyprus, even a simple drink of orange juice while driving can cause complications. You must stop drinking in the automobile if you are thirsty, which is very often during the hot Cypriot summer.

Smoking (Greece)

While smoking is illegal in work vehicles in the United Kingdom, you can smoke a pack of Silk Cut whenever you want in your personal vehicle. However, smoking is prohibited in all cars in Greece. So, if you're traveling from Alexandropoulis to Athens, bring a patch or leave it off.

Hitchhiking - (various countries)

Hitchhiking used to be romantic, but that is no longer the case. Raising your thumb and displaying cardboard signs is forbidden in many countries, including Russia. Picking up a hitchhiker is likewise prohibited.

Dirt (Bulgaria)

While having someone write LVALO on your white vehicle is an honor in Spain, it would cause you trouble in Bulgaria. No funny messages are allowed because it is essential to wash your automobile before entering the nation. Before you can enter Costa Rica, you must first fumigate your vehicle.

Women (Saudi Arabia) 

The law in Saudi Arabia prevents any woman from driving a car, thus there aren't many jokes from women behind the wheel.

Parking (Spain)

On one-way streets in some Spanish cities, parking is only permitted on the side of the street with odd-numbered houses on odd days of the month, and on the side of the street with even-numbered houses on even days of the month. Is that correct?